Alanna Kaivalya on Meditation

Alanna Kaivalya

A life-long obsession with sound has guided Alanna in the direction of music and vibration. Through the teachings of yoga, she has found a home for her spirit within the pulsations of the heart. She was born with a hearing impairment, but was taught from an early age that this is neither a setback or a difference. Instead, it is a way to thrive and shine. And so she has, by becoming a vocalist, a teacher, a musician, a writer, and a lover of sound, meditation, and vibration.

Read her thoughts on meditation:

"Most of us are multi-taskers. Balancing jobs, family, work and yoga can be a tough job, even for the most practiced yogi. We often wake up to fully scheduled days and hectic nights. How do we find any sense of calm in the middle of the storm? Sure, we can go to a yoga class, but what if our busy schedule doesn’t allow for that, either? How do we maintain our yogic bliss even when we’re surrounded by life’s little (and big) challenges?

It might be surprising to hear, but this is the answer: meditation. Like headstand, meditation is the yogi’s cure-all. Just as headstand can help to heal all the dis-ease of our body, meditation can heal all the dis-ease of our mind - which creates a different perspective for life.

We may think we don’t have time to meditate, but the reality is that we don’t have the time not to meditate. Meditation gives our brain the rest it needs to properly organize thoughts and priorities so you can go about your life in a much more efficient way. Plus, it’s easy and requires no props, no special clothing and can be done anywhere at anytime.

The essentials of meditation are a good seat, some kind of timer and a quiet moment. In the busiest of days, even 2 minutes of quiet meditation can set the tone for the rest of our interactions. Meditation helps us to maintain that “yogic buzz,” or that blissful cool that we feel after yoga. We tap into that quiet space and can stay there.

Here’s how it’s done: Find a comfortable seat. Maybe on the floor, maybe on a chair. It’s best not to lean against something, as that gives a tendency to slouch. Most cell phones are equipped with timers these days, so turn the ringer off and set the timer for as long as possible. Once the stage is set, close the eyes and tune into the breath. Many meditators find it helpful to focus on a phrase like “I am at peace,” or “Om namah shivaya.” Really, whatever provides focus will work just fine. Use the breath to repeat the phrase until the timer goes off. End with a deep inhale and exhale, and that’s it. Really. It’s just that simple.

And, trust me, the few moments spent in quiet meditation will prove to be the most valuable time in the day."

Visit Alanna's web site: www.jivadiva.com

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